WILD CARROT FARM

EST. 2003

Wild Carrot Farm continues their tradition of growing USDA Certified Organic produce, herbs, plants, berries and flowers in Northwest Connecticut.

 

The farm offers seasonal produce at local markets including the Canton Main Street Farmers Market in Collinsville and Mockingbird Kitchen in Bantam.

Be sure to join our email list to receive weekly updates on our produce listing and availability, and additional market locations.

WILD CARROT CREW & WORK SHARE

OPPORTUNITIES

are available for the upcoming season.

 

Contact Joanie at farmerjoanie@wildcarrotfarm.com

for more information.

Flower
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The Wild Carrot Story

WILD CARROT FARM ALL BEGAN IN 2003 WHEN MARK PALLADINO LEFT HIS DAY JOB IN ACCOUNTING AND STARTED FARMING ON 10+ ACRES IN CANTON, CONNECTICUT. JOANIE GUGLIELMINO, A NUTRITIONIST, HERBALIST AND FORMER RESTAURANT OWNER BEGAN WORKING WITH MARK SOON AFTER, AND TOGETHER THEY BUILT A REPUTATION FOR GROWING EXCEPTIONAL USDA ORGANIC PRODUCE FOR AREA MARKETS.

 

NINE YEARS INTO THE JOURNEY AND WANTING TO EXPAND THEIR OFFERINGS, THE COUPLE MOVED TO AN AVAILABLE PROPERTY IN BANTAM, CT, WHERE THEY HONED THE FORMER AVALON FARM TO IT'S FULL POTENTIAL, TURNING THE ONCE NEGLECTED LAND INTO A FLOURISHING CERTIFIED ORGANIC 8+ ACRE FARM.

 

IN 2020, WILD CARROT FARM SERVED OVER 200 CSA SHARE MEMBERS AND HUNDREDS OF RETAIL CUSTOMERS AT THEIR SEVERAL MARKET LOCATIONS. 

 

FAST FORWARD TO 2021, A YEAR OF TRANSITION... MARK & JOANIE ARE PROUD TO ANNOUNCE THE RECENT PURCHASE OF THEIR VERY OWN FARMSTEAD IN TORRINGTON, CT WHERE THEY CONTINUE THE TRADITION OF GROWING USDA CERTIFIED ORGANIC PRODUCE, HERBS, PLANTS AND BERRIES. IN ADDITION, THEY ALSO FARM PROPERTY IN CORNWALL AND MANAGE A THRIVING BLUEBERRY FARM JUST UP THE ROAD IN TORRINGTON.

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USDA CERTIFIED ORGANIC

GMO FREE

PRODUCE & BERRIES

ORGANIC CERTIFICATION requires farmers to document their processes and get inspected every year. On-site inspections account for every component of the operation, including, but not limited to, seed sources, soil conditions, crop health, weed and pest management, water systems, inputs, contamination and commingling risks and prevention, and record-keeping. Tracing organic products from start to finish is part of the USDA organic promise.

(www.usda.gov/media/blog/2012/03/22/organic-101)